batyr Quarterly Update – Q1 2016

Hi friends, 
We have had a big start to 2016 with lots of exciting news and achievements to share with you all. In the first three months we have; moved in with our good friends ‘The Happiness Institute’ and batyr’s now Chief Happiness Officer – Dr Tim Sharp, run new [email protected] programs at the University of New England & Macquarie University, welcomed Dr. Michelle Blanchard as our newest board member and delivered 20 [email protected] programs, smashing the stigma across the East coast. The team has also grown with new Program Coordinators starting in QLD and VIC this week.

KEY ACHIEVEMENTS TO DATE:

  • Over 36,000 young people reached through [email protected] and [email protected] programs
  • 177 participants trained in our Being Herd programs
  • Programs have been delivered to 115 schools & 5 universities
  • 77 Teacher PD participants
  • Help seeking rate is at 70%
  • Engagement rate is at 85%

[email protected]

The team have kicked things off strongly in 2016, with 20 programs across 13 different schools delivered to date and an additional 60 programs across 43 schools already booked in for the year, with a target of 150 programs to be run in 2016!

Our facilitator training has been finalised with training workshops to be held in Brisbane, Melbourne, Canberra and Sydney. This will allow for locally trained facilitators to deliver the [email protected] program to schools across the East coast of Australia.

Finally, and very excitingly we have developed a full year resource for schools to deliver the [email protected] chapter program where keen students are empowered to lead and drive positive conversations around mental health and help seeking within their schools and communities.

[email protected] Teacher PD

batyr’s teacher professional development is off and racing with three programs having been run at University of Technology, The Armidale School and Farrer High School, with an additional 4 programs secured in the next three months. The program is BOSTES & TQI accredited and counts towards teachers professional development hours. For more information please contact [email protected].

[email protected]

UTS
2016 Q1 has been the largest period of reach and impact for UTS students since the programs inception in July 2014. Among the highlights was our very first ‘Orientation Cafe’ space which was staffed by student volunteers between Feb 22 and Mar 18 and was a collaborative effort between the UTS Careers unit and batyr. Also in 2016 we will see the very first entire-faculty reach across first year students in both health and law with a [email protected] program.

ANU
2016 has seen a fantastic group of driven student leaders join the batyr family via our uni chapter. With this support we’ve been able to present our programs to over 300 students so far, and have reached over 1000 students through our initiates and events.

UNE
The expansion into the Tamworth/New Engalnd region is continuing with programs run for the UNE residential student leaders and Albies college so far this year. A group of passionate Albies students have also formed a fundraising committee to help support batyr in the local community, with the Albies sporting teams engaging in the One Sock One Goal campaign. A fantastic relationship we look forward to developing!

Being Herd

Through the Being Herd workshop, 25 participants were trained over 3 workshops in Sydney and Tamworth. We have seen around 10 new participants progress to become batyr Speakers who will share their story at [email protected] and [email protected] programs across the country. We are also placing the ground work down to train participants in VIC & QLD as new territories for Being Herd and are excited to give a voice to more stories in Q2.

“Stories have great power and have enormous potential to change lives. I feel that sharing my lived experience with mental ill health not only has potential to benefit a young person but has also made a great impact on my life personally ” 

UTS Being Herd Participant

Get involved ….

Darkness into light
 recently announced that batyr will become a major partner (along with Pieta House in Ireland) for their 2016 walk in Bondi. If you are in Sydney on the 7th May it would be great to see you down at Bondi Beach for an early start. To register, click here or to volunteer please email [email protected], 50% of funds raised will go to batyr.

We are looking forward to an even bigger and better quarter two.
Thanks for all the support,
The batyr crew

Rugby star raising mental health awareness – Seven Sport

Rugby star raising mental health awareness
Darren Walton – AAP

When he’s not throwing his weight around for the NSW Waratahs, Paddy Ryan is opening his arms to teammates in need of a hug.

Or at least lending a sympathetic ear as an ambassador for charity group batyr, which attempts to “smash the stigma” of mental health and urges teenagers talk about the issue.

Having Ryan, all 120kg of him, in the front row at high schools and universities raising awareness, is the perfect fit.

“One of the most inspiring things about Paddy – and all the (NSW Super Rugby) guys – is that is really does just smash the perception about what it is to be a tough guy,” batyr chief executive Sam Refshauge said after the Waratahs promoted the One Sock, One Goal awareness campaign at training on Tuesday.

“That’s what we are trying to do with a lot of those preconceived ideas, so it is actually seen as a strength when you put your hand up and say: ‘Look, I am actually not going that well, or I need some support’.

“Getting someone like Paddy up in front of a group of year nine or year 10 boys who historically would never have a conversation like that because it is seen as a weakness, as soon as you put someone like that up there, next to a person who shares their story about what they’ve been through, it completely smashes that stigma.

“And it encourages young people to put their hand up as well.”

In an average class of 30 students, batyr says seven kids will deal with mental health issues but only two will seek support.

Ryan, also a senior Rugby Union Players’ Association representative, is only too happy to try to help reduce the alarming amount of youngsters suffering in silence.

“Mental health is an issue that is close to my heart, it is close to my family and the opportunity arose to go and do a bit of stuff in schools,” the prop said.

“It is an organisation I am proud to be part of.

“I am not trained to be able counsel anyone, and I sure as hell wouldn’t say I am emotionally really good with that kind of stuff.

“But I am certainly not ashamed to ask a mate how they’re going.

“That’s all anyone needs to be able to do.”

Big Paddy ready to sock it to ’em – The Daily Telegraph

Waratahs prop Paddy Ryan helps spread positive mental health message with charity batyr.
Iain Payten – The Daily Telegraph

PADDY Ryan is the first to admit he’s not a touchy, feely kind of guy.

Which is why he is so perfect to send into a room of teenagers and start talking about mental health.

“I am not trained to be able counsel anyone, and I sure as hell wouldn’t say I am emotionally really good with that kind of stuff,” Ryan says.

“But I am certainly not ashamed to ask a mate how they’re going. That’s all anyone needs to be able to do.”
Ryan spreads that exact message as an ambassador for mental health charity batyr and yesterday the Waratahs lent their legs to the cause by promoting the “One Sock, One Goal” awareness campaign.

batyr is an organisation that attempts to “smash the stigma” of mental health and helps youngsters at school and university to talk about the issue and seek help if required.

In an average class of 30 students, batyr says seven kids will deal with mental health issues but only two will seek support, leaving five to suffer in silence.

Introduced by former NSW teammate Pat McCutcheon, Ryan has been a batyr ambassador for several years and he was recognised by his peers with a RUPA Community Service award last year for his otherwise unheralded dedication.

“Mental health is an issue that is close to my heart, it is close to my family and the opportunity arose to go and do a bit of stuff in schools. It is an organisation I am proud to be part of,” he said.

batyr CEO Sam Refshauge said 120kg Ryan talking to kids about being open with their feelings is incredibly powerful, and extremely effective.

“One of the most inspiring things about Paddy, and all the (Waratahs) guys today, is that it really does just smash the perception about what it is to be a tough guy,” he said.

“That’s what we are trying to do with a lot of those preconceived ideas, so it is actually seen as a strength when you put your hand up and say, look I am actually not going that well, or I need some support.

“Getting someone like Paddy up in front of a group of year nine or year ten boys, who historically would never have a conversation like that because it is seen as a weakness, as soon as you put someone like that up there, next to a person who shares their story about what they’ve been through, it completely smashes that stigma. And it encourages young people to put their hand up as well.”